Yesterday, Jeanette Gibson of Cisco’s new media group talked about the launch of their new Web 2.0 site on October 2.  (See my post here about the site.)  Why did Cisco add Web 2.0 features?  They’ve recognized that there is a shift of power in the market, according to Jeanette. They are changing the way they communicate and collaborate. It’s clear that consumers now drive content. Cisco marketing launched the ‘human network theme’—and asked consumers to post their own pictures and share stories with Cisco about how the network has changed their lives.  She said that they learn from their customers every day. (Very cool statement, right?)

Other key web site changes at Cisco:

  • Press room contains lots of videos. They are exploring how to maintain interactivity with customers and partners on the site. For example, how to deploy video, click to talk and more.
  • The ‘employee experience network’ internal blog, and wikis (project workspace/web site that all members can update) is place for employees to learn about new interactive communications and provide feedback.
  • Customers want more personalization on web site. Cisco offers folders for customers to add info that they want to return to—favorite white papers, etc. (Doesn’t ‘favorite white papers’ sound like an oxymoron?)
  • According to focus groups, personalization should also include the ability to post a sticky with notes about a piece of content, a great video and email to their boss, friend.

On how to measure results.  (Isn’t measurement always a sticky-wicket?)  Some of the ways Cisco is  gauging how the new Web 2.0 features are working. Execs ask:

  1. Who are the influencers we want to reach? Are they blogging/talking about Cisco?
  2. What are the Alexa (site that shows traffic rating for web sites) results for key pages. 
  3. How does info flow? They have to maintain a genuine dialog with each community. Cisco knows they cannot just shove messages out any longer. 
  4. How well are they pulling in new and different people (A-list bloggers) into mix with traditional influencers (editors, analysts). 

The Policy Blog is the top public Cisco blog.  Visitors find more specific, targeted views on a blog. They get the opinion of someone inside Cisco—more interactive, not just a press release.

In the future, brochures could become more authentic, like a blog. And lose the spin.

They know they need to engage with customers honestly; with more openness and authenticity.

How can you engage more interactively with your customers, web site visitors?

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